The new gender divide in education

By Andreas Schleicher Measured in the most common metric – average years of schooling – the industrialised world essentially closed the gender gap in education in the 1960s. And that has made a huge difference: about half of the economic growth in OECD countries over the past 50 years has been due to increased educational attainment, and mainly among women. But women still earn 15% less than men, on average in OECD countries, and 20% less among workers at the top of the pay scale. Some people are quick to say that this is about men and women doing similar work for different pay, but another factor is that men and women pursue different careers. And as our new report The ABC of Gender Equality in Education: Aptitude, Behaviour, Confidence suggests, those career choices may be made much earlier than commonly thought. http://www.oecd.org/pisa/keyfindings/pisa-2012-results-gender.htm

The report finds that, even though boys and girls show similar performance on the PISA science test, on average across OECD countries, less than 5% of 15-year-old girls contemplate pursuing a career in engineering or computing, while 20% of boys do (it’s almost exactly the other way round when it comes to health services). Gender differences in self-confidence in science explain part of this gap. So while many countries can claim victory in having closed gender gaps in the knowledge and skills of boys and girls, we may have lost sight of important social and emotional dimensions of learning that may be far more predictive for the future life choices of children. In most countries, teachers and schools need to do better to help girls see science and math not just as school subjects, but as essential to open up career and life opportunities. This is significant not only because women are severely under-represented in the science, technology, engineering and mathematics Read more! Get the best topics like movies, itunes, television and more, click @ ATE!

FOREX -Euro hits 11-year low as details on ECB easing programme awaited

TOKYO/SYDNEY, March 5 (Reuters) – The euro slid to its weakest level in more than 11 years against the dollar on Thursday, as investors waited for the European Central Bank to announce more details of its massive bond-buying programme. The ECB, which starts its quantitative easing (QE), or bond-buying, programme worth more than 1 trillion euros this month, is expected to detail the plan later in the day following its policy meeting. Markets will be looking for how the ECB’s quantitative easing will work, when the buying will start, whether it applies to paper with negative yields and how the purchases will be distributed along the yield curve. Investors have already driven yields across Europe to record lows in anticipation of the ECB’s largesse, greatly widening the yield advantage of the U.S. dollar in the process. Read more! Get the best topics like movies, itunes, television and more, click @ ATE!

A 7-Month-Old Baby Was Thrown 25 Feet In A Crash. What Happened Next Amazed Everyone.

By Dominique Mosbergen

A 7-month-old baby in a car seat was thrown more than 20 feet when a vehicle ran a red light and crashed into the van that her mother was driving. But when rescuers got to her, believing her dead, she is said to have opened her eyes and smiled at them, virtually unscathed.

According to WHIO-TV, the baby’s mother, Lashanda Goldsmith, was driving in Harrison Township, Ohio, Monday morning when the collision occurred.

Montgomery County Sheriff Deputies told the news outlet that the child was “thrown through the window on impact, while still in her car seat, and was found face-down 25 feet from the accident scene.”

Incredibly, the child, named Madison, only suffered a bruise on her head. Her mother also sustained only minor injuries. Two other individuals involved in the crash, however, were reportedly more seriously injured. The driver who allegedly caused the crash is said to have fled the scene, but was quickly apprehended.

As the story of Madison’s brush with death goes viral this week, many have expressed amazement at her unlikely survival. On Wednesday, KXRM-TV called the child a “miracle baby.”

(Go to WHIO-TV for more on this story.)

In 2013, Bangor Daily News reported that another “lucky” baby had survived after being flung 25 feet during a car crash in Maine. The news outlet reported that the child — a 6-month-old baby boy named Gabriel — had also been strapped into a car seat when the accident occurred, but he is said to have “slipped from his straps and was ejected 25 feet into snow.” Read more! Get the best topics like movies, itunes, television and more, click @ ATE!

Unions are key to tackling inequality, says top global financial institution

By Sabina Dewan This post is co-authored by Gregory Randolph.

Rising inequality is directly tied to waning rates of unionization, says a groundbreaking report released recently by the International Monetary Fund. Tackling the escalating problem of inequality – which endangers democratic institutions, limits economic mobility, and constricts economic growth – requires restoring the rights of workers in the United States and around the world to collective bargaining.

The findings couldn’t come at a more crucial moment. Estimates suggest that 1 percent of the world’s richest control 48 percent of the world’s $263 trillion in net household wealth. Global real wage growth has decelerated, and six years after the economic crisis, it has yet to return to pre-crisis levels. These trends coincide with steadily declining trade union density. In the world’s most advanced economies, where rates of unionization tend to be the highest, trade union density has decreased from 20.8 percent in 1999 to 16.9 percent in 2013. Today, only about one in 10 American workers is part of a union.

According to the IMF’s study, “the decline in unionization is strongly associated with the rise of income shares at the top.” The report illustrates that about half the income share gains made by the world’s wealthiest 10 percent are due to the decline in unionization.

The report goes further to suggest that high rates of inequality are “allowing top earners to manipulate the economic and political system.” This isn’t Elizabeth Warren speaking; it’s the global financial institution once popular with the likes of Ronald Reagan and better known for advocating hard-nosed fiscal policy.

Technology and globalization have long been blamed for the rising levels of national and global inequality. In some cases, the former can displace workers and increase the profit share of those who own Read more! Get the best topics like movies, itunes, television and more, click @ ATE!

FOREX-Euro hovers near 11-yr low, waiting on details of ECB easing programme

TOKYO/SYDNEY, March 5 (Reuters) – The euro wallowed near its weakest level in over 11 years against the dollar on Thursday, as investors waited for the European Central Bank to announce more details of its massive bond-buying programme. The ECB, which starts its quantitative easing (QE), or bond-buying, programme worth more than 1 trillion euros this month, is expected to detail the plan later in the day following its policy meeting. Markets will be looking for how the ECB’s quantitative easing will work, when the buying will start, whether it applies to paper with negative yields and how the purchases will be distributed along the yield curve. Investors have already driven yields across Europe to record lows in anticipation of the ECB’s largesse, greatly widening the yield advantage of the U.S. dollar in the process. Read more! Get the best topics like movies, itunes, television and more, click @ ATE!